Book Review “The Righteous Mind-Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion” by Jonathan Haidt

  • Ung-il Chung University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; School of Health Innovation, Kanagawa University of Human Services, Kanagawa, Japan

Abstract

Book Review of “The Righteous Mind-Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion”


Written by Jonathan Haidt (2012). New York: Pantheon Books. eISBN: 978-0-307-90703-5.

Author Biography

Ung-il Chung, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; School of Health Innovation, Kanagawa University of Human Services, Kanagawa, Japan

Dr. Chung graduated from University of Tokyo School of Medicine to obtain MD in 1989.  After working as Resident and Clinical Fellow in Internal Medicine at University of Tokyo Hospital, he entered and graduated from University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine to obtain PhD in 1997. In 1998, he was appointed Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and then Assistant Professor of Medicine in 2001. In 2002, he came back to his alma mater to work at Graduate Schools of Medicine and Engineering.  In 2007, he became Professor, Graduate School of Engineering; in 2013, Deputy Director and Research Leader, Center of Innovation “Self-managing Healthy Society”; and in 2019, Dean and Professor, School of Health Innovation, Kanagawa University of Human Services.

He specializes in skeletal biology/regenerative medicine and biomaterial science.  In Center of Innovation, he promotes industry-academia cooperation projects to measure and visualize health status of each individual for health personalization and behavior change.  In Kanagawa University of Human Services, he attempts to systematize and academicize ME-BYO concept for social implementation. He also studies the role of morality in Innovation management.

Published
2020-07-23
How to Cite
Chung, U. (2020). Book Review “The Righteous Mind-Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion” by Jonathan Haidt. Management:Journal Of Sustainable Business And Management Solutions In Emerging Economies, . doi:10.7595/management.fon.2020.0017
Section
Book Review